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Hey, Pet Sitters, Your Price Is Too High!

high-price1How many times have you been chatting on the phone with a perspective client for 30 minutes only to be told that she can’t afford it or your price is too high?

Believe it or not, a prospect that says such a thing rarely means that she can’t afford to pay that kind of money for your pet sitting service.

In fact, studies have shown that when you hear an objection like this, you actually still have a great chance of winning the client.

How? By asking the right questions to uncover her true objection. It may come down to not seeing the value in your offer or not quite trusting yet that you are the best for the job.

In any case, all hope is far from lost so imagine the disservice of simply accepting her objection at face value without getting a further understanding.

Let’s uncover some things a person may really be saying when you’re told your price is too high.

Here are 3 possibilities of what a price objection may really mean:

1) Not Worth It

When someone says ‘your price is too high,’ she may mean that the service you spelled out isn’t worth what you’re asking. In this case, you’ll need to go over the actual benefits of using your pet sitting service over other alternatives.

Focus on things like the pet remaining in a calm and familiar environment, the fact that you’re trained to notice any inconsistencies in the animal’s behavior and that you can provide glowing reviews and testimonials about the quality of your service.

Before taking your next phone call, jot down at least 10 different ways that you are the better choice over all others. Focus on what makes your service unique and what the distinct advantages of hiring you might be.

Keep this list by the phone and refer to it as necessary.

I’m also a big proponent of establishing trust and building rapport early on before even getting into the details of business. See how you can connect on a real and genuine level with your callers to help form a bond early on.

Keep this quote handy:

“All things being equal, people will do business with, and refer business to, those people they know, like, and trust.” — Bob Burg

2) Can’t Afford It

We all know we’re pinching pennies these days. And really, some people may simply not be able to afford your service on a financial level. If this is indeed the case, see if you can adjust the service to better meet her budget.

There is no shame in asking a client what she was looking to spend? Perhaps you can then customize a solution in her price range to make this a win-win. Never feel obligated to lower your fee for the stated service. It cheapens your value and you loose credibility.

Also, if she says she can’t afford it, see if you can work out a payment plan to help ease the number. Work the deposit angle.

3) A Better Deal Elsewhere

In this situation, a client may say your price is too high in relation to another pet sitter or company she received a quote from.

This one can be tricky since you’ll need to make sure that what you’re offering is identical to the other offer.

For example, are you both offering a 30-minute visit? Is there an additional fee for extra mileage? Key pick-up and drop-off? Weekend visits?

In other words, make sure the potential client is comparing the same service (not just a similar one) before she mentions your competitor is offering a better rate.

Keep The Conversation Alive

No matter how you deal with the price objection, don’t let it immediately end the conversation. Remember, your job as a pet sitter is to offer the best service possible at the best price profitable.

Seek to engage the client in determining what benefits are in fact the most important to her while looking for a pet sitter. Maybe you’ll touch on something you took for granted that she wasn’t even made aware that you offer.

Also, asking things like, “Is the price too high in relation to what you were expecting to spend, or have you found a better price elsewhere?” can quickly get the ball rolling in the right direction.

And that direction is a win-win situation for both you and your new client.

So, please comment below with how do you typically deal with price objection? And how often do you hear it?

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About Joshua Cary

Joshua Cary is an all around good guy. He is a filmmaker, web builder and business owner. He is a pet sitting business trainer, coach and instructor and has a passion for helping pet sitters build a strong business through a strong website. Joshua is also the co-founder of the Association of Pet Sitting Excellence (you should really check that out).

  • http://www.AnimalsReign.com/ Vicki Holt

    Joshua, I think your suggestions about pursuing objections to see if you can get past them is good advice. However, with 8 years in the business I almost never hear, “your price is too high,” even though my price is among the highest in my area.

    I find people are generally uncomfortable confronting cost directly. The “out” is always, I’ll check with my husband/wife and get back to you. That is about cost, but since people can’t come out and say it, drawing them out about their objections is almost impossible.

  • http://www.AnimalsReign.com Vicki Holt

    Joshua, I think your suggestions about pursuing objections to see if you can get past them is good advice. However, with 8 years in the business I almost never hear, “your price is too high,” even though my price is among the highest in my area.

    I find people are generally uncomfortable confronting cost directly. The “out” is always, I’ll check with my husband/wife and get back to you. That is about cost, but since people can’t come out and say it, drawing them out about their objections is almost impossible.

  • http://petsittingology.com/ Joshua

    Hi Vicki,

    Consider yourself lucky ;) In my neck of the woods, potential clients are a bit more forthcoming with their objections and seem to make it clear!

    This ‘price too high’ objection is of course just one of many and the ‘let me talk to my husband/wife about it’ is certainly one I hear on a regular basis too.

    For that reason, I have a post I’m putting together that aims to address that excuse head on. How do you usually deal with that one, by the way?

    • Dawn

      Josh did you address this ‘let me talk to me wife, objection in an article yet?’

      • Joshua Cary

        Hey Dawn, thanks for bringing this article back from the past – It is over 4 years old! Whether I addressed the ‘let me talk to my wife’ 4 years ago or not, you did just inspire my next post on that topic. It will come out tomorrow. As long as you are on my list, you will get notice as soon as I publish it. Sound good? Thanks!

  • http://petsittingology.com/ Joshua

    Hi Vicki,

    Consider yourself lucky ;) In my neck of the woods, potential clients are a bit more forthcoming with their objections and seem to make it clear!

    This ‘price too high’ objection is of course just one of many and the ‘let me talk to my husband/wife about it’ is certainly one I hear on a regular basis too.

    For that reason, I have a post I’m putting together that aims to address that excuse head on. How do you usually deal with that one, by the way?

  • http://www.petbusinessva.com/ Joan

    Hi Joshua!

    Someone posted this article in Facebook :)

  • http://www.petbusinessva.com Joan

    Hi Joshua!

    Someone posted this article in Facebook :)

  • http://petsittingology.com/ Joshua

    Hey Joan,

    Someone? Or someone named Joan?! Either way, PetSittingOlogy needs a Facebook page…

    Do you know anybody who does that kind of thing? Ya know, someone who understands and has a strong grasp on how social media works? Someone who ‘gets’ online marketing for the pet industry? A pet biz helper, of sorts… ;)

    UPDATE: Woo-hoo, We now have our own Facebook Page! Become a fan at http://www.facebook.com/pages/PetSittingOlogy/132031397144

  • http://petsittingology.com/ Joshua

    Hey Joan,

    Someone? Or someone named Joan?! Either way, PetSittingOlogy needs a Facebook page…

    Do you know anybody who does that kind of thing? Ya know, someone who understands and has a strong grasp on how social media works? Someone who ‘gets’ online marketing for the pet industry? A pet biz helper, of sorts… ;)

    UPDATE: Woo-hoo, We now have our own Facebook Page! Become a fan at http://www.facebook.com/pages/PetSittingOlogy/132031397144

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